Utilizing the enhanced colour rendering range of Adobe RGB

Illustration of color rendering ranges: Adobe RGB, SRGB, and ISO Coated color space

Adobe RGB is an RGB colour space launched by Adobe Systems Inc. in 1998 that is tailored to practical requirements. As shown clearly in the comparison in figure 1, Adobe RGB covers a wider colour rendering range than sRGB in certain areas, for example in the area between blue and green. Adobe Photoshop can edit image data stored with the Adobe RGB colour space. Modern high-performance scanners and professional digital cameras also work with the Adobe RGB colour space. If image data is stored with the Adobe RGB colour space, the monitors, which are used to render the images in question, must also support the enhanced colour rendering range of Adobe RGB.

Improving the accuracy of colour calibration of monitors

If a monitor can render the colors in the Adobe RGB colour space, the monitor can show, for example, the correct colour rendering range of an image taken with a digital camera in Adobe RGB mode. Moreover, there are the benefits of accuracy when editing the image.


Figure 1 shows that Adobe RGB covers the entire colour rendering range of the ISO Coated colour space in the prepress stage, and therefore covers a widespread standard in the printing industry. If a monitor can render the Adobe RG colour space, colour corrections can therefore be made more accurately during the soft proof.

In addition, there are now printing processes such as Hexachrome®, which also use orange and green as well as cyan, magenta, yellow, and black, and in this way support a colour rendering range that goes beyond sRGB. Such processes can be used to achieve better image quality. Therefore, monitors with a wider gamut are needed here.

Subject overview

Ensuring consistent colors in workflows and why colors do not match perfectly on different devices in practice.

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Comparison of hardware calibration and software calibration. Why does calibration have to be performed regularly?

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Adobe RGB covers a wider colour rendering range than sRGB in some areas, for example in the area between blue and green.

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